Paramotor Geometry, Part 1: What is your flying style?

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Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction.

“If someone’s first question about a paramotor is how much does it weight, I know this person has little knowledge about paramotors. While weight and power are the only measurable parameters of the paramotor, the geometry of the paramotor is way more important.”

This is the first video of a full series.
We will cover every aspect of paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the moment we have around 30 videos on the list. At the end of this, you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

The most important thing you need to know is what is or will be your flying style.
I would depict these categories:

* cross-country cruisers
* freestyle/slalom
* acrobatics
* thermalling with a paramotor

You need to know what is your flying style or what you think it could be in the future. Your style defines what is the ideal paramotor for you. For different purpose, different paramotors might be ideal. This is why you will see these categories in every video in our classroom.
Topics that will be covered in this classroom:
1. Intro: Searching for the ultimate best paramotor – what is or will be your flying style?
2. Paramotor suspension, part 1: Why suspension is the most important characteristics of a paramotor?
3. Paramotor suspension, part 2: Why weight-shift is more fun and more safe?
4. Paramotor suspension, part 3: How much weight-shift authority you get from your paramotor?
5. Paramotor suspension, part 4: Pitch stability under power
6. Paramotor suspension, part 5: Speed bar behavior
7. Paramotor suspension, part 6: Ground-handling and running with a paramotor
8. Paramotor suspension, part 7: Comfort in flight
9. Paramotor suspension, part 8: The big comparison of paramotor suspension systems
10. Torque steer is our big enemy, part 1: Why and how much torque we face?
11. Torque steer is our big enemy, part 2: Different ways how to fight back.
12. Torque steer is our big enemy, part 3: SCOUT Dynamic Torque Compensation.
13. Paramotor gyroscopic effect: How does depth of the engine affect the flying experience?
14. Geometry of the paramotor frame, part 1: Why being reclined is inefficient?
15. Geometry of the paramotor frame, part 3: Why being reclined is dangerous?
16. Geometry of the paramotor frame, part 4: Big comparison of paramotor frame geometry
17. Harness geometry, part 1 – getting in and out of the harness
18. Harness geometry, part 2 – carrying the paramotor
19. How much power do you need?
20. Standard 125 cm prop or larger?
21. How much does weight matter?
22. Do you need a clutch?
23. Electric starter or manual?
24. paramotor safety, part 1: Load test of paramotors
25. paramotor safety, part 2: Attachment of the gooseneck bars to the main frame
26. paramotor safety, part 3: crumple zones and back protection
27. paramotor safety, part 4: Beware of getting the throttle cable into the propeller
28. paramotor safety, part 5: propeller clearance
29. How important is aerodynamics of paramotors?
30. How much fuel capacity do you need?

Did we miss something you want to learn?
Please, leave a comment…

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/panthurr/tracks

Paramotor Geometry, Part 2: Why suspension is most important?

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Paramotor suspension system has the most impact on how much fun you will have in the air. It largely influences handling, your comfort and safety as well.

This is part 2 in our classroom. We will cover every aspect of paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the moment we have around 30 videos on the list. At the end of this, you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

The suspension is the very most important thing when choosing a paramotor. It has huge impact on handling:
1. weight-shift: how much fun you will have with tight turns
2. how turbulent it will feel
3. pitch stability under power
4. speed bar behavior
5. ground-handling and running with a paramotor
6. in flight comfort

Paramotor designers have to make a few decisions when designing a paramotor.
So if you want fully and deeply understand the differences, here are a few things to look at:
1. Where to place the carabiner relative to pilot’s body?
2. Bar fixed or moving?
3. Where to place the thrust line relative to the carabiner?
4. What shape of bar to use?
5. Where to place the bar pivot point for a moving bar?

Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction. So by the end of this classroom, you will be able to decide, what is the best paramotor for you.

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/jeff-kaale

Paramotor Geometry, Part 3: Why weight-shift is more fun and more safe?

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“I have to warn you: In this part I will be biased.
I am a big advocate of weight shift steering in paramotors.
I know many pilots who have switched to a weigthshift paramotor. I know zero pilots who have switched back.
It takes some time to get used to it, but then you will never want fly a non-weight shift paramotor.”
This is part 3 in our classroom. Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the moment we have around 30 videos on the list. At the end of this, you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

Whats the point of weight shift?
1. Look
2. Lean
3. Pull

This is what your paragliding instructor will tell you to do. This is how paraglider pilots core the thermalls. I know modern reflex gliders with 2D steering are so agile and fun to fly that some may believe they do not need the weight-shift. And that’s right. You do not need it. You can live without it. Without knowing what you are missing out.

But What are the benefits of weight-shift steering?
You give the glider two steering inputs instead of one. This means:
* half brake is enough to initiate the same turn
* with same brake input, your turn is more tight

This means your turns will be:
1. More efficient because with less brake your glider stays closer to its ideal profile
2. safer, because with less brake your risk of stall or spin is lower
3. more fun, because it just feels better with weight-shift

No, its not more turbulent! It may feel more nervous but the turbulence is the same. You at least have more feedback from the glider to react earlier and more accurate.

You definitely need weight-shoft steering for acrobatics, freestyle, slalom and thermalling.
You do not necessarily need it for cross-country PPG flights, but it definitely does not hurt!
Should you have questions, please, leave a comment or get in touch with Miroslav: miroslav@scoutparamotor.com.

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/panthurr/the-open-road

Paramotor Geometry, Part 4: How much weight-shift authority you get?

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Things might get a little controversial in this video… spicy especially in the second part of it.

This is part 4 in our classroom. Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the moment we have around 30 videos on the list. At the end of this, you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

Your weight-shift authority depends on following:
1. carabiner position: high, medium or low
2. bar type: fixed or moving

LEG WORK:
* Fixed bars keep the harness rigid and will not allow doing weight-shift by leg work.
* Moving bars will do: you could lift one leg and press the other down to unload one side of the glider and load the other.

LEAN OVER THE BAR:
Yet the more efficient way of doing weight-shift steering is leaning over as you transfer a lot more weight to one side.
* High suspension systems will not allow you to move your body sideways as you have the carabiners next to your ears and there is nowhere to move to.
* medium and low suspension systems have the bar under your arm and nothing on the side of your body. Thus feel free to lean over the bar.

The paramotor fights back:
Weight-shift steering is basically an effort of getting your paramotor out of balance position. The higher the suspension point is the stronger is the tendency of the paramotor to swing back – more pendulum auto-balance behavior.

Summary:
* Low suspension + moving bars + little pendulum auto-balance = best weight-shift
* high suspension will give you least weight-shift authority.

TEASER for next video: there are at least two pictures in comparison WRONG. Try to find out before we explain in next video….

Understand your paramotor to become a better pilot.

Should you have questions, please, leave a comment.
Thanks for watching.
Thanks for sharing.

www.scoutparamotor.com

music: https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud

Paramotor Geometry, Part 5: Pitch stability under power

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Now it’s time to add some power!

In the last video we had two pictures wrong, so come along with us and find it out after we’ve added some power!

This video speaks about 4th decision that a paramotor designer needs to make and that is where to place the thrust line relative to the carabines.

To prevent pitching forward or backward, paramotor designers needs to move their cages with whole motor and propeller. Find out which system and how needs to be moved.

Little spoilers, the gooseneck bars won this time, so stay tune for more videos like this!

In the next video we will add to power some SPEED!

Should you have questions, please, leave a comment or get in touch with Miroslav: miroslav@scoutparamotor.com.

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/coreygagne/tracks

Paramotor Geometry, Part 5: Pitch stability under power

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Now it’s time to add some power!

In the last video we had two pictures wrong, so come along with us and find it out after we’ve added some power!

This video speaks about 4th decision that a paramotor designer needs to make and that is where to place the thrust line relative to the carabines.

To prevent pitching forward or backward, paramotor designers needs to move their cages with whole motor and propeller. Find out which system and how needs to be moved.

Little spoilers, the gooseneck bars won this time, so stay tune for more videos like this!

In the next video we will add to power some SPEED!

Should you have questions, please, leave a comment or get in touch with Miroslav: miroslav@scoutparamotor.com.

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/coreygagne/tracks

Paramotor Geometry Part 6: Speed bar behavior.

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Pushing the speed bar sometimes leads to surprising results. And the suspension system is crucial.

This is part 6 in our classroom. Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the end of the roughly 30 videos in the series you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

Pushing the speedbar has two direct and immediate effects:
1. your upper back applies pressure on the paramotor frame backwards
2. your center of gravity changes especially when pushing the speedbar forward not downwards.

While pushing the speedbar with your legs your body seeks for support and leans against the paramotor frame with your upper back. This cause some trouble with the low suspension with moving bars. Consider the bar as the fixed part of the paramotor and the frame rotates around the hinge. As the pressure on the frame is above the bar hinge, the frame will lean backwards. Now the thrust line is pointing upwards thus some part of the engine power gives you lift = decreasing the wing loading. With lower wing loading the speed is lower than it could be.
To minimize this behavior it is recommended to push the speedbar straight down on such paramotors so you need to seek less support with your upper back. This increases wing drag and is sub-optimal as well.

A better solution are the goosenecks bar where the hinge is behind pilot’s upper back thus the you lean directly into the pivot point and the frame remains neutral.
When pushing the speed bar straight forward, the pilot’s center of gravity moves forward and pilot and paramotor leans forward too. This will point the thrust line slightly down and part of the engine power increases the wing loading. With higher wingloading the speed increases.

On high hook-in paramotors the the straps go all around the body and are highly tensioned = the harness does not flex and remains neutral.

Summary:
1. high suspension paramotors remain neutral when speedbar is applied
2. low suspension with fixed bars remains neutral
3.. low suspension with moving bar will lean backwards which is an unwanted behavior
4. Medium suspension with gooseneck bars remains neutral or even slightly pitch-positive.

Should you have questions, pleasse leave a comment.
Thanks for watching
Thanks for sharing

Hit the subscribe button so you do not miss the next part: How paramotor suspension affects your comfort in flight.

www.scoutparamotor.com

Music: https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud/tracks

Paramotor Geometry Part 7: Ground-handling and running with a paramotor.

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Your flight starts on the ground. Lift the glider and run. And yes, your suspension system affects your groundhandling more than you would think…

This is part 7 in our classroom. Miroslav Svec, designer of SCOUT paramotors shares his knowledge about paramotor construction, the theory and reasoning behind. At the end of the roughly 30 videos in the series you will be able to make a qualified judgment what is the ultimate best paramotor for you.

With high suspension systems your glider is a bit too high and so are the glider controls. The As, the Bs and the brakes get a bit out of sight and out of reach. With low suspension systems your controls are in a lot more natural position.

On the other hand, low suspension paramotor have the cage positioned pretty low thus hitting your heels when running. A change to hit the ground is higher as the ground clearance is lower.

With paramotor hanging low on your back you need to lean forward a lot more to regain balance. Such a inclined position is not ideal for groundhanling and running the first steps.

Summary: The medium suspensio gooseneck bars seem to be the best compromise (again).

Paramotor Geometry Part 8: How paramotor suspension affects the comfort in flight?

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So let’s talk about comfort in flight this time!

In this video you will learn that the suspension has a big impact on your comfort in flight.

We decided that your comfort in the air can be measured in three ways:
1: Reach for the glider controls
2: Reach for the camera(reach for all the stuff you need during flight)
3: How nervous the glider feels in turbulence.

So stay with us and you will learn, which suspension system is best for your style and for you!

 

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